Wondering what a Likert Scale is? A Likert scale is basically a scale used to represent people's opinions and attitudes to a topic or subject matter. The Likert scale ranges from one extreme to another, for example “extremely likely” to “not at all likely. It uses psychometric testing to measure beliefs, attitudes, and opinions of subjects. 

Likert scale is important for research because it can be used to measure someone's attitude by measuring the extent to which they agree or disagree with a particular question or statement. Likert Scale questions constitute one of the most widely used tools in researching popular opinion. 

What is a Likert Scale? 

A Likert scale is a psychometric scale commonly involved in research used to represent people's opinions and attitudes to a topic or subject matter. It employs questionnaires, often used interchangeably with a rating scale, although there are other types of rating scales to measure opinions.

What are Likert Scale Points?

Scales are used to rank people's judgments of objects, events, or other people from low to high or from poor to good. A scale is a continuum from highest to lowest points and has intermediate points in between these two extremities.

In 1932, Rensis Likert, a psychologist interested in measuring people's opinions or attitudes on a variety of items, developed the original Likert scale. Today, Likert scales are widely used in social and educational research.

The difference between a proper scale and a Likert scale is that Likert differentiated between the underlying phenomenon being reviewed and the means by which the variation is captured. This eventually points to the underlying phenomenon. The Likert scaling assumes that the distance between each choice/option is equal.

On the whole, a Likert item is simply a statement that the respondent is asked to evaluate by giving it a quantitative value on any kind of objective dimension, with a level of agreement and/or disagreement being the dimension most commonly used.

Want to design a Likert scale questionnaire? Sign up with formplus to start using over 10 options and rating fields for your online surveys. 


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Here are the 3 most popular Likert Scale Points;

4 Point Likert Scale

4 point Likert scale is basically a forced Likert scale. The reason it is named as such is that the user is forced to form an opinion. There is no safe 'neutral' option. Ideally a good scale for market researchers, they make use of the 4 point scale to get specific responses.

Pros of a 4 Point scale

  • In certain cases in which a specific user opinion is essential, the 4-point scale is most ideal.
  • Best for recording opinions on services/products which the user has used/experienced.
  • Usually, Likert scales are odd-numbered scales. It provides an exception to the rule

Cons of a 4 point scale 

  • A 4 point Likert scale is observed to distort the results.
  • A 4 point Likert scale forces a choice when a respondent has no opinion
  • A 5 point Likert scale data is more accurate than the 4 point data.
  • Respondents might not answer at all. In many cases, it is preferable to know that they were neutral rather than having them not answer the question at all.

Four Point Likert Scale Example

4 point likert scale examples includes a 4 point scale for frequency with options; never, rarely, often and everytime. A four point scale example for Agreement with options ranging from strongly disagree & agree, a four point likert scale example for satisfaction, whose option ranges between strongly satisfied and dissatisfied.

  • 4 Point Likert Scale Example for Frequency

To measure frequency, customer care surveys can make use of an even Likert scale question.

  • 4 Point Likert Scale Example for Agreement

This question that goes either way that is linked with intermediate agreement answer options. These questions are used to measuring customer satisfaction.

  • 4 Point Likert Scale Example for Satisfaction: The two sides to satisfaction such as satisfied and dissatisfied will be interlinked with other answer options without a neutral answer option.

Interpretation of a 4 Point Likert Scale

  • To interpret a 4 point scale, assign each response a point value, from 1 to 4, based on the number of responses. 
  • Common values for the options start with "strongly disagree" at 1 point and "strongly agree" at 4. 
  • Create a table for your results and find the Mode (number of times something occurs) and the average response (Mean). 
  • The mode will tell you the most common response to each statement while the mean will give you the overall average response.

Create a 4 Point Likert Scale Questionnaire on Formplus

5 Point Likert Scale

5 point likert scale consist of 5 answer options which will contain two extreme poles and a neutral option connected with intermediate answer options. A commonly used 5 point Likert scale examples to measure satisfaction is: Very satisfied, Satisfied, Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, Dissatisfied and Very dissatisfied.

Over time, Likert’s original 5-point scale has taken new forms. It offers 5 different answer options related to an agreement that would be distinct enough for the respondents.

Pros of a 5 Point scale 

  • It is relatively easier for respondents to understand.
  • A 5 point scale is ideal for a larger study.
  • 5 point likert scales tend to produce better distributions of data

Cons of a 5 point likert scale 

  • It is sometimes inaccurate.
  • 5-point scales can't measure all attitudes towards an issue.
  • The results of a 5-point scale might not be objective.

Examples of Five Point Likert Scale Questionnaires

  • 5 Point Likert Scale Example for Agreement

This scale would consist of 5 answer options which will contain polls and a neutral option connected with intermediate answer options. These scales can be used in a similar manner for measuring likelihood, importance, frequency, and many other factors.

  • 5 Point Likert Scale Example for Satisfaction

This scale of measuring satisfaction will offer 5 answer options such as satisfied and dissatisfied with a neutral option at the midpoint. These options are interlinked with other options that would provide respondents the variations they look for.

  • 5 Point Likert Scale Example for Frequency

To measure the frequency of an occurrence with other options that would provide respondents the variations they look for.

How to Interprete a 5 Points Likert Scale Questionnaire 

  • Assign each response a point value, from 1 to 5, based on the number of responses. 
  • Common values for the options start with "strongly disagree" at 1 point and "strongly agree" at 5. 
  • Create a table for your results and find the Mode (number of times something occurs) and the average response (Mean). 
  • The mode will tell you the most common response to each statement while the mean will give you the overall average response

7 Point Likert Scale

7 point likert scales are an upgrade to the 5-point scale. A 7-point likert scale ranges from one extreme to another, like “extremely likely” to “not at all likely.”

What is a 7 point Likert Scale? 

A 7 point likert scale offers 7 different answer options related to an agreement that would be distinct enough for the respondents, without throwing them into confusion. Typically, it includes a moderate or neutral midpoint, and 7 point likert scales are known to be most accurate of the Likert scales

Pros of a 7 Point scale 

  • It is the most accurate of the Likert scales
  • It is easier to use 
  • It gives a better reflection of a respondent's true evaluation.
  • The best solution for questionnaires such as those used in usability evaluations.

Con of a 7 point scale 

  • Respondents' answers will be influenced by previous questions

Examples of 7 Point Likert Scale

A 7 point likert scale example for agreement will include options such as; strongly disagree, disagree, somewhat disagree, neither agree or disagree, somewhat agree, and agree while 7 point likert examples for frequency and satisfaction follows the same manner.

  • 7 Point Likert Scale Example for Agreement:

This scale offers 7 different answer options related to an agreement that would be distinct enough for the respondents to answer without getting confused. These scales can be used in a similar manner for measuring likelihood, importance, frequency, and many other factors.

  • 7 Point Likert Scale Example for Satisfaction

This scale of measuring satisfaction will offer 7 answer options such as satisfied and dissatisfied with a neutral option at the midpoint. The other options must be distinct and should add value to the scale in such a way that respondents can provide precise feedback without any hindrances.

  • 7 Point Likert Scale Example of Frequency

To measure the frequency of occurrence in such a way that respondents can provide precise feedback without any hindrances.

How to Analyse and Interpret a 7 Point Likert Scale

  • Assign each response a point value, from 1 to 7, based on the number of responses. 
  • Create values for the options start with "strongly disagree" at 1 point and "strongly agree" at 7. 
  • Create a table for your results and find the Mode (number of times something occurs) and the average response (Mean). 
  • The mode will tell you the most common response to each statement while the mean will give you the overall average response.

Other Likert Scale Points Includes; 

  • 2 Point Likert Scale

The 2 point Likert scale is the simplest Likert scale question example where there'll be just two likert options, such as agree and disagree as two poles of the scale. It is typically used to measure Agreement.

  • 3 Points Likert Scale

3 Point Likert scale is a scale that offers agree and disagree as to the polar points along with a neutral option. Like the 2-point scale, the 3 point scale is also used to measure Agreement. Options will include: Agree, Disagree and Neutral.

  • 6 Points Likert Scale

A 6 point likert scale forces choice and gives better data. And, if at any point a neutral is desired, the “slightly agree” and “slightly disagree” can be averaged together. The 6 point Likert scale offers options for Extremely satisfied Very satisfied, Somewhat satisfied, Somewhat dissatisfied, Very dissatisfied and Extremely dissatisfied.

  • 9 Point Likert Scale

9 point Likert scale ranges from 1(strongly disagree) to 9 (strongly agree). This, in turn, provides very elaborate data and provides a wide variety of choices to the respondent. 

  • 10 Points Likert Scale 

A 10 point Likert scale will offer more variance than a smaller Likert scale, provide a higher degree of measurement precision and provide a better opportunity to detect changes and more power to explain a point of view.

Want to design a Likert scale questionnaire? Sign up with formplus to start using over 10 options and rating fields for your online surveys.


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How to Create a Likert Scale Questionnaire with Formplus 

1. Register or sign up on Formplus builder

Start creating your Likert Scale questionnaire signing up with either your Google, Facebook or Email account. Formplus gives you a 21-day free trial to test all features and collect online data. Pricing plan starts after trial expiration with reasonable discounts for Education and Non-Profit Organizations. 


Sign up to design your customized online questionnaire or survey form with Formplus.

2. Input your Likert scale questionnaire title and use the form builder choice options to start creating your questionnaire. 


Add a choice field like single select, multiple select, checkbox, radio, or image choice.

3. Do you want customers to rate any of your products or services delivery? 

Use the rating to allow survey respondent rate your products or services. 



4. Beautify your Likert scale questionnaire with Formplus Customisation features.


  • Change the theme color
  • Add your brands’ logo and image to the forms
  • Change the form width and layout
  • Edit submission button if you want
  • Change text font color and sizes  
  • Do you have already made custom CSS to beautify your questionnaire? If yes, just copy and paste it to the CSS option. 

5. Edit your Likert Scale questionnaire settings for your specific needs

Formplus builder gives you the liberty to choose your storage options (Formplus Storage, Dropbox, OneDrive, and Google Drive). You can also limit the number of responses, enable Captcha to prevent spamming, and collect information about your respondent location.

Set an introductory message to respondents before they begin the survey, toggle the “start button” post final submission message or redirect respondents to another page when they submit their questionnaires. 


 Initiate an autoresponder message to all your survey respondents. 

6. Share links of your Likert scale questionnaire page with customers.

There’s an option to copy and share the link as “Popup” or “Embed code” The data collection tool automatically creates a QR Code for Survey Questionnaire where you can download and share as appropriate. 



7. View Responses to the Likert scale Questionnaire

Toggle with the presentation of your summary from the options. Whether as a single, table or cards. In addition, you can make graphs from received responses, and translate these into charts and key metrics. 

8. Let Formplus Analytics interpret your data from your Likert scale questionnaire 

You can also monitor your form performance and identify your traffic source and location with Formplus Analytics.

With online form builder analytics, you can determine:

  • The number of times the Likert scale questionnaire was filled
  • The number of customers reached
  • Abandonment Rate: The rate at which customers exit the questionnaire without submitting. 
  • Conversion Rate: The percentage of customers who completed the online form
  • Average time spent per visit
  • Location of customers/respondents.
  • The type of device used by the customer to complete the Likert scale questionnaire

Best Formplus Features to Use For Point Likert Scale

Choice Options 

  • Radio Choice

Preparing a Likert scale, use Radio choice to ask your respondents to choose a single option from a shortlist. Radio Choice questions should always be used when asking yes or no questions. 

  • Image Choice

You can also use images as your answer options or customize the icons themselves. Image Choice is a simple, closed-ended question type that lets respondents select one or more image answers from a defined list of image likert scale choices.

  • Check Boxes

A checkbox is a small box on a form into which a tick or other mark is entered as the response to a question. They allow your respondents to select multiple answers from a list. Checkbox questions are easy to analyze since they are closed-ended.

  • Single Select

Single-Selection is a questioning system where a user is asked to pick only one answer, from a predetermined set of responses of at least. Single selection lets you create questions with several pre-configured answers for participants.

Ratings

  • Scale Rating

The Rate scale records how much or how well it happened. The scale usually has several points ranging from "poor” to "excellent" or something in a similar arrangement. This scale is used to evaluate the performance of a product or service, employee skills, customer service performances, processes followed for a particular goal, etc

  • Star Rating

The Star Rating scale question lets respondents evaluate a statement on a visual scale of stars. For instance, products are awarded a rating from 1 to 5 Stars by customers to reflect where it belongs. The higher the Star Rating, the better

  • Heart Rating

Similar to the Star Rating, the heart Rating question lets respondents evaluate a statement on a visual scale of hearts. A weight is assigned to each heart icon on the scale. 

  • Matrix Rating

A Rating Scale question, commonly known as a Likert Scale, is a variation of the Matrix question where you can assign weights to each answer choice. A Matrix question is a closed-ended question that asks respondents to evaluate one or more row items using the same set of column choices. 

  • Smile Rating 

The Smile Rating question lets respondents evaluate a statement on a visual scale. Whereas the sad face shows negative ratings and the smiling face shows a positive rating. Smileys are evaluated better and perform similar to traditional radio buttons, there seems to be an advantage in using smileys as a response.

Conclusion

A Likert scale is a very quick and easy to run this type of survey that can be sent through all modes of communication. They provide a universal method of collecting data, which means it is easy to understand. If you're working with quantitative data, it is easy to draw conclusions, reports, results, and graphs from the responses.

Furthermore, because Likert Scale questions use a scale, people are not forced to express an either-or opinion, rather enabling them to be neutral should they so choose. Despite that, a huge downside to using Likert Scales is that respondents either lean towards choosing the most extreme option or express no opinion at all.

Want to design a Likert scale questionnaire? Sign up with formplus to start using over 10 options and rating fields for your online surveys. 



Use Likert Scale Features to Create Forms for Survey




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